Emergency Medical Technology and Paramedic

What is the difference between an EMT and a paramedic?

EMTs respond to emergency calls, perform certain medical procedures and transport patients to hospitals in accordance with protocols and guidelines established by physician medical directors. They may work in an ambulance service (paid or voluntary), as a member of technical rescue teams/squads, or as part of an allied service such as a fire or police department. EMTs also work in hospitals, industrial settings, national and state parks and in remote locations such as oil drilling operations. EMTs are trained to assess a patient’s condition, and to perform such emergency medical procedures as are needed to maintain a patient airway with adequate breathing and cardiovascular circulation until the patient can be transferred to an appropriate destination for advanced medical care.

Paramedics are trained in all the basic EMT skills plus advanced life support skills (ALS).  They are advanced medical professionals who primarily respond to and treat medical emergencies outside of medical facilities. Paramedics operate under licensed emergency physicians to deliver the highest level of advanced life support available outside of a hospital. They are trained to keep critical patients alive by assessing illnesses and injuries and by providing life-sustaining treatment on the scene and during transport to a hospital emergency department.

DSCC offers four options for those interested in the Emergency Medical Services or Paramedic fields. There are two Associate of Applied Science options, an EMT - Paramedic Technical certificate, and a Basic EMT course.  Each option enables graduates to work as an EMT following  licensure by the state of Tennessee.  

Certification Levels
    EMT-P (Paramedic)
    EMT-I (Intermediate)
    EMT-B (Basic)
 
While providers at all levels are considered emergency medical technicians, the term “paramedic” is most properly used in the United States to refer only to those providers who are EMT-P’s.

►Basic EMT courses
EMT 101 and 102 may be taken as a non-degree student

► Associate of Applied Science
    Emergency Services Major
    EMT concentration
Graduates of this program will demonstrate the competencies needed to become a role leader in emergency medical services or public safety.

► Associate of Applied Science
    Emergency Services Major
    EMT-Paramedic concentration
Program graduates will have gained the needed skills to function as a role leader in emergency medical services or paramedic.
Associate of Applied Science coursework may be applied toward a Bachelor of Science degree.

► Emergency Medical Technicial-Paramedic Certificate
This 12-month program enables licensed  Tennessee EMTs to become advanced emergency service providers.

DSCC offers the Associate of Applied Science in Emergency Services, basic EMT courses and an Emergency Medical Technology (EMT-Paramedic) certificate program. Upon completion of the DSCC courses, students will be prepared to take the National Registry EMT written and practical tests to demonstrate their entry-level competency.  After their national certification is completed, students may apply for state licensure which allows those who pass to practice in Tennessee.

Students must be 18 years of age and must possess a regular high school diploma or have completed a GED to enroll in EMT courses.  AHA Healthcare provider CPR certification is required.  A criminal background check and a drug screen will be conducted.

DSCC offers the following options for students interested in
Emergency Medical Technology (EMT) and Paramedic
(PARA) courses:
Option One: EMT I and EMT II
EMT I and EMT II are approved by the Tennessee Department of
Health, Division of Emergency Medical Services. Upon successful
completion of both courses and a passing score on the state examination,
students may apply for state licensure as an Emergency
Medical Technician. For more information, see Criteria: State of
Tennessee, Division of EMS Rule (1200-12-1.04 and 1200-12-1-
.13) pursuant to T.C.A. Title 68, Chapter 140.
Prerequisites:
1. Must be at least 18 years of age;
2. Must possess a regular or academic high school diploma
or GED; Must hold a current CPR certification as an
American Heart Association Healthcare Provider or must
complete EMT 1000 with a “C” or better;
3. Must pass a criminal background check and a drug screen
for all EMT courses. EMT 101 and EMT 102 must be completed
in the same academic year. A minimum grade of
“C” in EMT 101 is required to progress to EMT 102.
Option Two: AAS in Emergency Services Major with a
Concentration in EMT

The prerequisites listed under Option One apply to this option
unless transfer credit is awarded for EMT course work with a
“C” or better.
Option Three: EMT-Paramedic Technical Certificate
Prerequisites:
1. Must undergo a psychological profile conducted by a licensed
psychologist;
2. Must complete an EMT knowledge test;
3. Must complete an oral interview; Must complete the following
Learning Support courses, if applicable: DSPR
0800, DSPW 0800, DSPM 0800; minimum grade of “C”
is required;
4. Must complete BIOL 2010 and BIOL 2020 or BIOL 1000
or equivalent with a “C” or better in each course.
5. Must pass a criminal background check and a drug
screen for all PARA courses.
Option Four: AAS in Emergency Services Major with a Concentration
in EMT-Paramedic

This program is approved by the Tennessee Department of Health,
Division of Emergency Medical Services. Upon successful comple-
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tion of the required course work and a passing score on the state
examination, the student may apply for state licensure as an EMTParamedic.
For more information, see Criteria: State of Tennessee,
Division of EMS Rule (1200-12-1.04 and 1200-12-1-.13)
pursuant to T.C.A. Title 68, Chapter 140.
Prerequisites:
1. The above prerequisites apply unless the student is
transferring Paramedic program courses with a “C” or
better.
2. Students must earn a “C” or better to progress to other
PARA courses and to complete the program.
Note: The following criteria are required by clinical affiliates.
These requirements may have different timelines than those
of the state EMS rules and regulations.
3. Proof of satisfactory physical and mental condition –
Cost is the student’s responsibility.
4. Proof of current immunizations – In addition to proof of
other immunizations as required by Tennessee law, effective
July 1, 2011, students expected to have patient
contact must present proof of protection against hepatitis
B before patient contact begins.
5. Proof of a negative TB skin test or chest X-ray, as indicated.
TB skin tests are required yearly.
6. Proof of background check and drug screen – Detailed
instructions will be given during the first class meeting.
Costs of background check and drug screen are the student’s
responsibility.
For the assurance of patient safety, clinical facilities require a
criminal background check and drug screen before a student begins
any clinical lab experience involving patient contact. Based
on the results of these procedures, an affiliated clinical site may
prohibit a student’s presence at the facility. Such action will result
in the student’s inability to successfully complete course and
program requirements. Additionally, conviction of certain crimes
may make applicants ineligible for licensure even if they successfully
complete the EMT-Paramedic program. Students who have
not completed the background check or paid for the drug screen
within three working days after class begins will be withdrawn
from the program.
Healthcare insurance is highly recommended.
For more information, contact the EMT/Paramedic program director.